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Lake Geneva or Lake Léman is the lake that is spread across Switzerland as well as France. It is one of the largest lakes in Western Europe. The Lake Geneva is formed from the withdrawal of glacier and has a crescent shape which gets narrowed down towards the
Yvoire on the southern shore. It can thus be divided figuratively into the “Grand Lac” (Large Lake) to the east and the “Petit Lac” (Small Lake) to the west. The Chablais Alps are situate on its southern shore, the western Bernese Alps is situated at its eastern side. The high summits of Grand Combin and Mont Blanc can be seen from some places on the lake. Compagnie Générale de Navigation sur le lac Léman (CGN) operates boats on the lake.

The lake is on the course of the Rhone River that too has its source at the Rhone Glacier near the Grimsel Pass to the east of the lake and flows down through the Canton of Valais, entering the lake between Villeneuve and Le Bouveret, before curving slowly towards its way out at Geneva. Other tributaries of the River are La Dranse, L’Aubonne, La Morges, La Venoge, and La Veveyse. Lake Geneva is the known largest body of water in Switzerland, and is too big in size in comparison to other water bodies that are twined with the main valleys of the Alps. The beauty of the shores of the lake is well celebrated and is center of tourist attraction, globally.

Due to intensive pollution and excessive human intervention, the lake was closed down in 1960s as a transport artery for commercial and construction materials. At the start of sixth decade pollution levels made it hazardous to swim at some beaches of the lake. Even, tourist there having a ride in the local submarine, there assumed to have a zero visibility. By the 1980s, the intense environmental pollution in the lake almost cleared the lake of any fishes. Pleasingly, presently, the pollution levels in the lake have been bringing down to a considerable level and now it is considered as safer to swim in the lake.

On scientific front in 1827, the Lake Geneva was used as the first ever site to measure of the speed of sound in (fresh) water. French mathematician Jacques Charles François Sturm and Swiss Physicist Daniel Collodon used two moored boats, separated by a measured distance, to transmit and receive platforms for the sounds of exploding gunpowder. The loud airborne sound joined into the lake, set up a loud underwater sound that later on measured at a distance.
Yacht racing is very popular sport activity in the Lake Geneva and there many high –performance catamarans have made for the lake. More leisure activities that a person can have in a lake are sailing, wind surfing, boating, rowing, scuba diving and bathing.

Lake Geneva

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